Doing it for themselves: participation and black and minority ethnic service users

Written by admin on Thursday, August 17, 2006 14:00

New report from the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and the Race Equality Unit (REU)

The report explores the myths that some use to explain the level of black and minority ethnic service user participation, including the idea that participation is not a priority for some groups and that the service user movement embraces and represents black and minority ethnic service users.

Service user participation in social care has increased markedly in the wider service user movement over the last 20 years, however, the participation of black and minority ethnic service users has diminished over the same period. This report identifies some of the reasons for this reduction, and concludes by stating that given the right opportunities, support and resources, there is genuine commitment and interest from service users to become more actively involved in the process.

Key points

  • Over the last 20 years, mainstream service user participation in social care has increased markedly whereas black and minority ethnic participation has diminished over the same period.
  • Policy-makers and practitioners often consult with black and minority ethnic professionals and community leaders, rather than going direct to service users themselves.
  • There is no evidence to suggest that black and minority ethnic service users do not want to participate.
  • Social care professionals have an important role to play in facilitating participation.
  • Race equality issues must become part of mainstream activities.
  • Black and minority ethnic service user participation does work when properly supported

Download the full report here


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